What Does an Automotive Service Manager Do?

By | October 15, 2016

The automotive service manager is the person that is responsible for the supervision of the service department for an auto dealer. They act as go-between for the customer, mechanic, and an auto dealer. The major part of their duties includes customer satisfaction and customer relations. They are ultimately the individual who is responsible for productivity and profitability of the service department. Part of this responsibility includes sales, and keeping all customer service records.

This individual is also in charge of supervising all elements of safety as they pertain to maintenance of customers’ autos. As part of their duty they supervise the complete mechanical process, assuring only the highest level quality service is provided. They are responsible for the inspection of every vehicle that has been repaired or worked on within the service department and are also responsible for selecting an individual who oversees this in their absence.

The automotive service manager must be an individual who is able to focus on several different things at the same time. This includes the supervision of all personnel, the service department, and hiring and supervising. They also must keep track of all service data files that documents any pertinent information retained to employees, including reviews and raises.

The service manager ensures the dealer at the service department obtains the goals of the dealership as they pertain to the budget. In many cases, they may be expected to create and monitor a marketing plan that involves the creation of current and recurring business. For many automotive dealers service, customers typically consist of individuals who have purchased cars in the dealer. You may also be required to generate this information from outside the current clientele.

New vehicles repairs are typically covered by warranties. It is the responsibility of the service department manager to understand the intricacies of all warranties and to inform the staff of this information. Service managers must also beware of any information obtained relative to recalls.

Typical service managers have a background in automotive repair and will most likely have worked for the dealer he is now employed by. Some dealerships hire from outside of their service staff if it does not create a conflict between employees. No matter where they have gotten their training, it is necessary that this individual has years of experience as a mechanic. Usually it is desired that this experience is on the brand of cars the dealer carries.

This position is typically a well-paid position and, in many cases, includes a respectable benefits package. In many instances this individual will receive a demo car and full medical and dental benefits. Being promoted for this position can be lucrative and rewarding for an experienced mechanic.

Source by Ben Pate

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